Speed Bills! Legislation Clears Way for 75-MPH Michigan Speed Limit

January 5, 2017 at 7:21 pm by Andrew Wendler | Photography by Getty/Eastcott Momatiuk

USA.

USA.


Michigan governor Rick Snyder has signed legislation allowing the increase of the posted speed limit to 75 mph on particular freeways. Intended for and restricted to sections of freeway in rural areas, the increases are contingent on findings of targeted traffic and security studies performed by the Michigan State Police and the Michigan Division of Transportation.

Specifically, House Bills 4423-4427 call for the state’s DOT to allow the speed limit to be increased to 75 mph on far more than 600 miles of restricted-access freeways (mostly designated interstates) and to 65 mph on at least 900 miles of non-freeway state “M” numbered highways, but only if the safety and engineering research show that to be the 85th percentile of speeds currently driven on those roads—which most people driving these roads these days would tell you is pretty a lot a formality. The current maximums permitted are 70 and 55 mph. The most most likely candidates are freeways in the northern part of the state, including the Upper Peninsula. Primarily, this is a reasonable way for the state to say: “You know that rural freeway Up North exactly where the public has currently come to terms with the flow of traffic routinely exceeding the posted limit by ten mph? Well, let’s try to take a small of the hypocrisy out of the complete situation.” The bills also decrease the points penalty on drivers’ records—from three or two points to one—for those cited for exceeding the limits by a margin among five and 15 mph.

The bills also enable raising the maximum speed limit for trucks from 60 to 65 mph and adjust measures utilised by insurers to figure out eligibility for auto insurance.



Governor Snyder added, “Ensuring that all Michiganders are safe whilst operating autos on our state’s roadways is critically essential, and these bills permit for appropriately enhanced speed limits on specific roadways right after security studies are performed.”


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Missing Hyperlink: Will Wireless Charging Assist Energize the Electric-Automobile Marketplace?

Chevrolet Volt fitted with inductive charging

Chevrolet Volt fitted with inductive charging

While it’s easy to dismiss wireless charging for smartphones or tablets as mere gimmickry in its present state, the technology shows critical promise out in your driveway—where it could play an crucial function not just in how you charge your automobile but in how quickly electric cars catch on.

Wireless charging (also referred to as inductive charging) systems use electrical energy from the grid to generate an electromagnetic field that can recharge batteries across a gap, such as in between a charging pad on your garage floor and a vehicle parked above it. Despite the fact that the technology has been teased for decades, the newest iterations of wireless charging get more than two engineering hurdles: the lack of physical flexibility among the charging pad and the vehicle’s receiver, and the power lost by such systems.

Wireless charging utilized to be much less efficient than a physical charging port, but the most recent systems from WiTricity, Qualcomm (Halo), and Samsung are doing far better. WiTricity’s new original-equipment method achieves outstanding all round efficiency numbers of 91 to 93 %, measured from the power grid to the car battery, even though a typical plug-in Level 2 charger is considered effective at 88 percent or so, and Level 1 (110-volt AC socket) systems are considerably significantly less efficient.

That WiTricity system, Common Motors sophisticated technologies spokesman Kevin Kelly confirmed, is in a “prototype testing” phase with the Chevrolet Bolt EV and Volt—although any future availability for these models is not but a offered.

Alex Gruzen, WiTricity CEO

Alex Gruzen, WiTricity CEO

Alex Gruzen, WiTricity CEO

According to Alex Gruzen, CEO of WiTricity, the efficiency gains are achieved by way of the MIT-born company’s technical focus on physics and resonant frequencies. “If you can develop a really efficient resonator, some magic occurs, and you can move power with great efficiency,” he explained. Gruzen said that with the company’s existing technologies, it can fine-tune the system to work with four to 10 inches of ground clearance. And that—with a guidance method to aid the car get centered—allows a lot of flexibility for the kind of car and the way the charging mat is mounted in a driveway, garage, or parking lot.

A Single Regular That Need to Just Function

WiTricity is endorsing a single sector normal for wireless charging—and compromising on a frequency that would perform around the world even though keeping power levels and efficiency. The SAE standard in the functions, which the engineering group calls J2954, establishes an 85-kHz frequency band and covers four energy levels: three.7 kW, 7.7 kW, 11. kW, and 22. kW. The normal will also support interoperability among pads and receivers from various businesses.

At present, the 22-kWh power level will be out of attain for most household installations—although it could be a decrease-price option to quickly charging for commercial installations at restaurants or purchasing centers. Greater levels of up to 50 kW are in the functions, but those are reserved for industrial cars, such as electric buses.

Earlier this month, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in collaboration with six organizations (which includes Toyota, Nissan, and Jaguar Land Rover) completed bench testing in help of J2954 and engaged in a series of interoperability tests. Significantly perform toward the normal has already happened.

By the time the common is finalized in early 2018, many models might already be on the market place with inductive charging. The 2018 Mercedes-Benz S550e plug-in hybrid is expected to supply or incorporate the feature—in that case, supplied by Qualcomm—and Nissan has hinted that it could be available on the subsequent-generation Leaf, coming as a 2018 model. A number of other automakers are involved with WiTricity: Toyota is an investor, and the business earlier this year announced a collaboration with Nissan.

Mercedes-Benz S-Class Plug-In Hybrid

Mercedes-Benz S-Class Plug-In Hybrid

Expense has been another deal breaker for inductive charging systems. The cost for the charging pad, receiver, energy management hardware, and handle computer software can add up to a number of thousand dollars. But WiTricity CEO Gruzen expects that costs will not stay the sticking point for long.

“Like every little thing in this organization, the fees are falling drastically as volume increases,” he stated, mentioning the company’s perform to involve the China Automotive Technologies and Investigation Center (CATARC), which guides such standards in China. “Common architecture indicates scalability, which means that the elements go to volume more rapidly.”

WiTricity is not the only company that believes the technologies is reaching a tipping point. Evatran, which manufactures the Plugless Energy line of aftermarket wireless chargers—for models like the BMW i3, the Chevrolet Volt, the Nissan Leaf, and the Tesla Model S—also plans to enter the original-equipment market soon, and it already has in China. “We count on that 2017 will be a defining year for OEM announcements on wireless EV charging primarily based on the intensity of interest we are seeing across the board,” mentioned Steve Cummings, Evatran’s senior manager of brand and marketing and advertising strategy.

Are Autonomous Vehicles the Missing Hyperlink for Sharing?

“We see wireless charging as becoming important to the future of mobility,” said Gruzen. For vehicle-sharing fleets and autonomous vehicles—and anyplace it’s not the operator or passenger’s responsibility to use a physical charger—wireless charging at designated parking spots could support hold automobiles in use a greater portion of the time.

The new standards apply only to stationary systems. The possibility of dynamic inductive charging is a associated technologies, but it involves systems embedded into roadways to charge cars constantly along some routes—potentially reducing the want for cars to carry around huge, bulky battery packs. As you may possibly guess, that includes a series of more complex infrastructure queries.

In the meantime, the easier thought of shedding the charge-cord hassle at home and generating nightly charging second nature could be what warms up a lot more folks to electric automobiles.

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Infiniti Bringing Autonomous Tech and New Engine in Detroit Show Notion

Infiniti is inching closer to a production version of the next-generation QX50, the existing version of which has soldiered on with reasonably minor changes since 2008 when it was introduced as the EX35. At the 2017 Detroit auto show in January, Infiniti’s QX50 concept will preview what the new mid-size crossover will appear like and what it may be capable of. It will not be our first sneak peek at the new QX50, either—Nissan’s luxury brand showed a comparable concept at the Paris auto show in September, following the QX Sport Inspiration’s initial unveiling in Beijing earlier this year.

Besides highlighting Infiniti’s Effective Elegance design and style language, which includes a cabin-forward silhouette, the notion also previews the brand’s newest autonomous-driving technologies. Unlike self-driving tech touted by some automakers as possibly rendering a steering wheel and pedals obsolete, Infiniti says its new autonomous tech will ensure drivers remain in handle of the autos, as component of what the brand named a concentrate on driver engagement. We’ve heard this ahead of, of course, and it translates to a sort of semi-autonomous capability wherein mundane driving tasks—stop-and-go targeted traffic, highway slogs, and the like—might be handled by the personal computer.

Infiniti is playing coy about the next QX50’s mechanicals, but in an announcement, the organization hinted that the new SUV could be a future property for the nearly production-ready variable-compression-ratio 4-cylinder (VC-T) that made its debut earlier in 2016. Adding to the intrigue, that turbocharged two.-liter engine will be displayed alongside the QX50 in Detroit. We consider the new engine’s estimated 268 horsepower makes it a probably downsized replacement for the current QX50’s 325-hp 3.7-liter V-six. Infiniti claims the turbo four could provide up to “a 27 % improvement in fuel efficiency over V-six gasoline engines of similar energy output.”

Infiniti-QX50-Concept-REEL


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Happy Holidays!

Happy Holidays! We wish you a peaceful and joyous Christmas and a happy and creative 2017! As usual, we do this with a Christmas card created by our friend Bernie Walsh. 2016 has been a excellent year for Car Physique Style, with a a lot awaited restyling and lots of stories and sources published. However, it has also [&#8230]
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World’s Freakiest Custom Ford Coming to Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale Auction

December 24, 2016 at 8:32 am by Clifford Atiyeh | Photography by Barrett-Jackson

Ford-Torino-Florea-art-car-front-2

Ford-Torino-Florea-art-car-front-2

We’ve seen two pedigree Ford Torinos priced larger than new Ferrari 488s. This 1971 instance is not a single of these Torinos.

Next month, Barrett-Jackson will try to auction this non-operating, plastic-grafted abstract interpretation of a Torino. Illinois artist Ioan Florea has an enigmatic theory behind his 2013 creation, saying that it symbolizes the bridge among the second Industrial Revolution that peaked with Henry Ford’s assembly line and the third Industrial Revolution of 3D printing, now aborning.

Ford-Torino-Florea-art-car-rear

Ford-Torino-Florea-art-car-rear

Florea, born and raised in Communist-era Transylvania, specializes in textured paintings and sculptures that involve printing plastic skeletal formations and dousing them in metallic pigments. During his childhood, Florea’s automotive world was defined by soulless Dacias, so an imported 1971 Torino—almost nobody’s dream car in our country—was like an exotic temptress, constructed in the very same year the artist was born. Maybe his fascination with bones aids clarify it. If you were a tiny boy digging up animal skeletons in a country exactly where folks buried them to steer clear of jail (hunting was broadly prohibited), probably it would make sense to cover a Torino with 3D-printed plastic resembling calcified warts and vertebrae. (And you believed you and your buddies did the wildest, most unspeakable issues with ’70s muscle vehicles.)

Ford-Torino-Florea-art-car-front

Ford-Torino-Florea-art-car-front

In 2013, Florea mentioned he wasn’t sure there would be any “commercial value” to his Torino, but he is now convinced that an individual at the Scottsdale auction who won’t bother bidding on Barrett-Jackson’s pristine 1976 Chevrolet Monte Carlo will favor his artistic statement, a silvery tribute to the malaise era. Name your price tag, folks: There’s no reserve. Any offer must be regarded generous.


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